03Mar
Which One of Three Retirement Income Strategies is Right for You?
Investing
(The source for much of the material in this short blog is taken from the November 1, 2016 “Journal of Investment Consulting”. The article is entitled, “An Overview of Retirement Income Strategies”, written by Michael Finke, PhD, CFP © and David Blanchette, CFA ©, CFP ©.)

Gains in medical science or environmental improvements can result in added longevity for all retirees.  This means that all retirees could face a retirement time horizon that ranges anywhere from about 10 to about 40 years.

This essentially leaves the retiree with three primary choices about how to create retirement income:

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21Feb
Some Interesting Insights Thus Far for 2017
Blogs / Articles

As our nation and the world continue to watch the actions and react to the rhetoric of the new Administration in Washington, we have already witnessed some incredible activity.

From the resignation of National Security Advisor Michael Flynn to Kim Jong Un’s missile launch, we are witnessing daily tests – both domestic and global.

How is this influencing the markets?

  • Emerging market (EM) assets outperformed, U.S. Treasury yields fell sharply during the last week of January, and U.S. value stocks underperformed a flat market.
  • Political uncertainty sent French and Italian government bond yields to multi-year highs relative to their German peers.  Half of the European firms that have reported earnings have beaten estimates.
  • Oil fell to a near three-week low under the pressure of growing U.S. crude inventories, but pared some losses. China’s PMI data showed expansion in both services and manufacturing sectors.

And what might be coming?

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15Feb
How the World Shops Is Changing
Economy

Recently, Capital Ideas shared the following information which I think you will find interesting:

By 2025, 4.2 billion people out of a global population of 7.9 billion will be part of the consuming class.

For the first time in history, the number of people with discretionary income will exceed the number of people still struggling to meet basic needs.

Here are some of the changes in consumer spending which is led by millennials:

  • Chinese millennials are “all about the experience”.  This includes going to the movies and increasing their travel abroad.  They spend considerably on-line for lifestyle items.
  • Another country positioned to benefit from the increased spending is India.  In the next 10 years, about 150 million new people will enter India’s workforce.  Highways, airports, and other infrastructure is expected to increase along with consumer spending.
  • The 80 million American millennials spend at least $600 billion a year.  They are adding to the success of businesses like Uber and HomeAway.

Consumer spending drives 70% of the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP).

We will watch for new investment possibilities based on this information.

We welcome the opportunity to share a cup of coffee and conversation with you.

Barbara A. Culver
CFP®, ChFC®, CLU, AEP®
Resonate, Inc.
(513) 605-2500

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07Feb
Are You Positive or Negative on the U.S. Economy for 2017?
Economy

Interestingly, a case can be made either way.

Because I prefer to end my blogs on a positive note, let’s first look at what might detract from or slow economic growth in 2017.

1.   The strengthening US dollar.  Since the November 2016 election, the dollar is up 4%.  It is predicted to increase by another 5% this year.  (Source: Kiplinger Letter 1-13-17)
Anyone want to go to Europe?

2.   Gradually rising interest rates.  This could impact sensitive sectors such as housing and auto sales.

3.   The uncertainty of trade wars.  If the president makes good on campaign promises, countries could retaliate by buying less U.S. goods.  Punitive tariffs are also a possibility.

Now let’s consider the positives.

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01Feb
Feeling Money Pressure and Stress?
Economy

The American Psychological Association
published a study called “Paying with Our Health”.

 

I found it to be especially informative; it also raised my awareness about the impact of financial stress in the lives of women.  It further increased my concern for women and money as I read about the relationship between financial stress and physical health.

Here are some excerpts from the article:

Year after year, women’s experiences with stress continue to be troubling. They consistently report higher stress levels than men do, and they appear to have a hard time coping.1 These patterns also emerge when it comes to their relationship with money and finances.

  • Women report higher levels of stress about money than men (5.0 vs. 4.3 on a 10-point scale) and are more likely than men to say they feel stress about money all or most of the time (30 percent vs. 21 percent).
  • Women who say their stress about money is high (8, 9 or 10 on a 10-point scale) are more likely than women who say they have low stress about money (1, 2 or 3 on a 10-point scale) than to say they engage in sedentary or unhealthy behaviors to manage their stress, such as watching television/movies for more than two hours per day (55 percent vs. 38 percent), surfing the Internet (57 percent vs. 34 percent), napping/sleeping (41 percent vs. 23 percent), eating (40 percent vs. 19 percent), drinking alcohol (21 percent vs. 9 percent) or smoking (19 percent vs. 7 percent).
  • Women who say their stress about money is high are significantly more likely than women who say they have low stress about money to rate their health as fair or poor (34 percent vs. 13 percent).

1:  Men n=1204; Women n=1864.

Does any of this fit for you or someone you care about?

If so, please know that the Resonate team considers it both our privilege and responsibility to hold the conversation about “Money and Stress”.  We have prepared multiple resources designed to create alternatives and fresh ideas designed to reduce financial stress.

We are comfortable engaging in these emotional conversations and recognize the importance of them.

We welcome hearing your concerns about money and are committed to sharing stress-relieving ideas designed especially for you.

Please contact us for a complimentary conversation.

Barbara A. Culver
CFP®, ChFC®, CLU, AEP®
Resonate, Inc.

(513) 605-2500

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27Jan
A Physician’s Perspective on Aging
Issues of Aging

Regardless of age, most Americans are concerned about the aging process – either for themselves or for a loved one.

Resonate shares your concerns.  I recently read an interesting article called “6 Warning Signs of Financial Decline and Better Health While Aging” by Leslie Kernisan, MD.  I thought she made some important points and hope you find value on the following thoughts.

Dr. Kernisan begins by citing a study from the National Endowment for Financial Education, which was covered in the New York Times.  She begins her article by sharing the key warning signs of financial decline from this study.

They are:

  • Taking longer to complete everyday financial tasks
  • Reduced attention to details in financial documents
  • Decline in everyday math skills
  • Decreased understanding of financial concepts
  • Difficulty identifying risks in a financial opportunity

For each of these warning signs, the New York Times lists several specific examples (e.g. taking longer than usual to complete a check register).  If you’ve had any concerns about an older person’s financial abilities, I highly recommend you use this list as a guide.

It can be found here.

Now, here are five important things Dr. Kernisan adds that we need to know about aging and financial decline.

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23Jan
Thoughts on the U.S. and International Bond Market for 2017
Economy

(The source of the following is BNY Mellon Weekly Fixed Income Market Commentary December 7, 2016, Investing Haven “Bond Market Outlook for 2017”: “Investment Outlook” Bill Gross, Janus Capital Group.)

There are currently two key drivers of the market.  One is the election of Donald Trump, and the other is central banks.  The banks are significant, because they are the largest holders in the debt market.

From the U.S.:  Interest rates increased one-quarter of one percent to 0.75% in December 2016.

From Europe: We expect the ECB to extend the current Quantitative Easing buying program.  (The ECB is currently buying 80 billion euros per month.  The expiration date is March, 2017.)

Why is this important?  It is important because increasing interest rates impact stocks, gold, commodities, and currencies.  Based on recent signs, rising rates have a negative impact on gold and a positive influence on the dollar and financial stocks.

As we work to define the impact in 2017, we will be watching the 20 year bond market (TLT) and what happens to other sectors when the TLT reaches amounts around the $120 level.   TLT is an Exchange Traded Fund (ETF) that tracks the 20 year Treasury.

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17Jan
Expect These Campaign Promised to Be Kept
Economy

In my previous blog, I shared which campaign promises are expected to be broken.   This blog covers the ones expected to be met.

(Source: The Kiplinger Letter November 11, 2016.)
  1. Domestic oil, gas, and coal production will be more in favor. Drilling in new regions as well as offshore will be favored.
  2. He will push hard for more spending on infrastructure.
  3. Trump will try to overhaul financial regulations in order to boost bank lending. (Dodd-Frank is at risk.)
  4. The Trump isolationist stance will force European nations to spend more on their own defense and security needs.
  5. Trump is likely to rip up the Iran nuclear deal and issue new sanctions.


Barbara A. Culver

CFP®, ChFC®, CLU, AEP®
Resonate, Inc.

(513) 605-2500

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11Jan
Money… From Source of Stress to Valued Resource
Intergenerational Planning

Money… for many of us….is a complex, controversial and sometimes competitive topic.  While each generation has its distinct challenges, money can also be the number one stressor for individuals, couples, and families.

In this blog, I explain how each generation relates to money, how money stresses the generations, and offer solutions to the crushing stress factor.

Let’s begin with the World War II Generation or those born between the years of 1925 and 1942.

For many in this generation, also called “The Silent Generation”, money was associated with the deep scars of scarcity created by the Great Depression.  Therefore, the emphasis was on saving and always spending less than they earned.  This generation was largely content with keeping one house for as long as possible and keeping cars and other possessions until they wore out.  The primary money motivator for the WW II Generation was to replace scarcity with “having enough” or sufficiency.

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04Jan
Campaign Promises Most Likely to be Broken
Economy

In the November 11, Kiplinger Letter, we find the following ideas which I thought would be of value to you:

  1. President-elect Trump stated: “I will increase the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth to 4% a year”.  Kiplinger believes the 2017 GDP
    to be closer to 2.1%; in-part, due to the fact that fiscal change will happen more slowly than the president-elect predicted.
  2. There will be no wall built on the border between the U.S. and Mexico.
  3. Trump will find it difficult to create the relationship he wants with Putin.  Even though the goal of closer ties would be to defeat ISIS and end Syrian conflict, collaborating with Putin will draw great resistance from the U.S. military.
  4. Repealing Obamacare immediately.  This topic is very tricky.  The details will take years to sort out; nothing is going to happen quickly.

Barbara A. Culver
CFP®, ChFC®, CLU, AEP®
Resonate, Inc.

(513) 605-2500

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