On Saturday June 11, 2016, there was a senseless, horrific attack on members of the GLBT community.

While the politicians rush to affirm “this was an attack on all Americans,” the GLBT population has been attacked and discriminated against for centuries in ways that only those who live the life can understand.

Because the discrimination too often emanates from the family of origin, on hearing the news, I asked myself: “What happens to the survivors of those killed?

“What happens if the decedents had not taken care of their estate and legacy planning to assure that their physical and financial assets were transferred to whomever the GLBT person wanted?”

What we know is that, if we do not take control of our planning and estate documents, then the state in which we reside has a distribution plan for us. This is called dying intestate (without a will in place).

Often times, dying intestate only intensifies the tragedy of sudden loss. For example, if someone who was murdered Saturday night was also partnered, but died intestate, here is the chart that shows how assets pass by intestate succession in Florida:

If you die with: here’s what happens:
·   children but no spouse ·   children inherit everything
·   spouse but no descendants ·   spouse inherits everything
·   spouse and descendants from you and that spouse, and the spouse has no other descendants ·   spouse inherits everything
·   spouse and descendants from you and that spouse, and the spouse has descendants from another relationship ·   spouse inherits 1/2 of your intestate property

· your descendants inherit 1/2 of your intestate property

·   spouse and descendants from you and someone other than that spouse ·   spouse inherits 1/2 of your intestate property

· your descendants inherit 1/2 of your intestate property

·   parents but no spouse or descendants ·   parents inherit everything
·   siblings but no spouse, descendants, or parents ·   siblings inherit everything

(Source: NOLO “Intestate Succession in Florida”)

It is easy to see how these unexpected deaths can results in someone not only losing the most important person in his or her life, they may also lose financial well-being.

The Resonate team partners with attorneys to assure that your financial and legal plans and documents are coordinated and will work together.

In the midst of our sorrow, may we also find the resolve to be certain that our plans are current and state exactly what we want to have happen… “just in case.”